NZ Post Children’s Book Awards – 2014

untitled (2)The New Zealand Post Children’s Book Awards – 2014
Posted 9 April, 2014, very early in the morning

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And the nominations are…
Junior Fiction
* A Winter’s Day in 1939 – Melinda Szymanik (Already well read and loved in my classroom)
* Dunger – Joy Cowley (Doing the rounds at the moment)
* Felix and the Red Rats – James Norcliffe (Must get!)
* Project Huia – Des Hunt (Popular with the boys)
* The Princess and the Foal – Stacey Gregg (Well loved by more than just the horse book readers)

Young Adult Fiction
* A Necklace of Souls – Rachel L Stedman (Won the 2012 Tessa Duder Award for a work of fiction for Young Adults 13 and above)
* Bugs – Whiti Hereaka (Superb – have already reviewed)
* Mortal Fire – Elizabeth Knox
* Speed Freak – Fleur Beale (Consistent – Can see it in a Year 10 English Class replacing Slide the Corner – maybe)
* When We Wake – Karen Healey

Very exciting to finally have the short list and see that many of these books are already well known and loved. I am particularly pleased to see ‘A Winter’s Day in 1939’ by Melinda Szymnaik, and ‘Bugs’ by Whiti Hereaka, both of which I have really enjoyed.
I still have some reading to do, as I haven’t read ‘Felix and the Red Rats’ by James Norcliffe. Shame on me. But I have never been able to get ‘The Loblolly Boy’ or its sequel ‘The Loblolly Boy and the Sorcerer’ to take flight in the classroom. I will need to retry, perhaps.
This year, to try something a little different, I am going to try to post book reviews of the children who have read the books, as well as my own thoughts, before the Grand Announcement of the winners on Monday 23rd June.

I am slightly disappointed by the lack of male authors in the Young Adult Section, but as I think the judges have done a great job of selecting a range of fresh and interesting titles, as well as including some tried and true, I’ll suspend judgement on that for now.

Posted 6 April, 2014

Two days away from the short list, and I probably look as though I’ve been slacking a bit. To be fair, I’ve been caught up in the rush of finding great books for the students at school, and it has been hard to figure out just which books I should be reading to prepare for this year’s Book awards – and that is a little bit concerning to me.  Where is the hype for NZ Children’s Literature?

A couple of weeks ago I went to ‘Creating Readers’, a presentation at the Wellington Writer’s Festival. I was surprised and disappointed at how few people were there. To be fair, it was on at 9.15am on a Sunday morning. And I can tell you that a 3hr drive on Sunday morning, after a friend’s 50th the night before, was a reasonably tough challenge. In truth, we snuck away from the 50th early, and my first thought when I got up at 5am the next morning was that they were probably just off to bed now!

You’re probably wondering about the relevance… Well, here it is. ‘Creating Readers’ was an outline of research that had taken place in New Zealand, by Kids Lit Quiz creator Wayne Mills, and early childhood specialist Celeste Harrington, through Auckland university. Essentially they surveyed participants in the NZ Kids Lit Quiz, over a year, asking them to tell them what books they were currently reading, who their favourite authors were, and what their favourite titles were. Children who take part in the Lit Quiz are between 10 and 13 years old (Years 6 – 8). Around 1600 children filled in the survey, and they obtained about 7300 results. While I would query the title ‘Creating Readers’ when you are surveying the avid kinds of readers who take part in the Lit Quiz, it still provides us with some really interesting information about what children this age are reading.

Top ten favourite authors were:

1. JK Rowling

2. Suzanne Collins

3. Roald Dahl

4. Rick Riordan

5. Jacqueline Wilson

6. JRR Tolkein

7. Robert Muchamore

8. Michael Morpurgo

9. Anthony Horowitz, and

10. Enid Blyton

Not an NZ Author in sight… However, when sorted into top ten female authors, Margaret Mahy comes in at number 6. Top ten male writers, still no NZ writer in sight.

The top ten NZ authors, when sorted, were

1. Margaret Mahy,

2. Des Hunt

3. Joy Cowley

4. Fleur Beale

5. Stacy Gregg

6. Brian Faulkner

7. David Hill

8. Maurice Gee

9. Lynley Dodd

10. Jack Lasenby

And the top ten titles included: Hairy Maclary From Donaldson’s Dairy (Joy Crowley – 1983), Juno of Taris (Sherryl Jordan – 2008), The Tomorrow Code (Brian Faulkner – 2008), 2MUCH4U (Vince Ford – 1999), Brain Jack (Brian Faulkner – 2009), and Cry of the Taniwha (Des Hunt – 2009). My apologies for not recording them all. I have misplaced my handout and I didn’t manage to get them all written down. This is a good range of titles, and I would recommend all of them. And it is pleasing to see how many of them were Award winners in previous years. But where are our current books? And aren’t there a lot of gaps? I don’t believe it is the quality of our writers that is an issue. There is something not quite right with the publicity, or the way the word is being spread (or not spread) about great new New Zealand books for children and young adults.

 

Posted  20 January, 2014

Bugs – Whiti Hereaka
Young Adult, NZ fiction. Five stars.
9781775501336

I think Bugs may well be one of the most believable, angry, perverse, defensive and clever adolescent characters I have read, in quite some time. She’d be bloody hard to have around, but you’d have to admire how staunch she is, not that she’d care. And don’t bother trying to pull the wool over her eyes. She’s already decided what she thinks of you, and most likely you’re not going to get a Christmas card any time soon.
Bugs, and her mate Jez, live in picture perfect Taupō. But, as Bugs points out, it’s not really perfect:

‘I’m walking home from work. Mum likes to make out like I’ve earned her trust back, but I reckon it’s because she’s working late and Uncle can’t be arsed. So I get to walk home unsupervised – big whoop – like I’m some seven-year-old. But it’s the only chunk of freedom I’ve been allowed these holidays, so I’ll take it. And it’s kind of nice to wander home; it’s warm in the afternoon but not too hot yet. It’s that funny time in spring when the world seems confused: daffodils and snap frosts, lambs born too early dying in the cold. That time when you can sit at the lakefront in just a t-shirt and look at the mountains still frozen with snow and think it’s like a postcard – but then the mountains remind you that they’re real: the wind changes and their cold breath chills you.’

And a lot of this is what the book is about – the conflict of expectation and reality, rich and poor, poor and poorer, youth and age, surface and depth, good and bad, absolute and relative, what-I-see and what-you-see. The setting of volcanically active Taupō, with its volcanoes angry below a cracked surface of boiling mud pools and geysers, is a brilliant metaphor for adolescence and adds to the feeling that something is going to blow at any time. Lake Taupō was formed by a volcanic explosion, and Ruapēhu is still actively rumbling.

Bugs, like any teenager, is a bundle of conflicts. She’s clever enough to question the adults around her, and to examine the school system, actually every system, and find it very much wanting. But she’s also quick to judge, and decide what others believe and think. That adolescent ‘don’t judge me, but I’ll judge you.’ She’s angry. A lot. But she’s also vulnerable. Jez is her best mate and has been for ever, and now Stone Cold, the new rich chick in town, is trying to get in on the act. Bugs trusts no-one, but she especially doesn’t trust Stone Cold, who seems to have everything and value nothing.

Bugs resents the way the school tries to ‘motivate’ Māori youth:

I was barely older than that kid, that time the teachers rounded up all us kids – actually rounded us up – no shit, it was like the teachers were header dogs…Anyway, there’s all us kids – OK Māori kids – rounded up for a seminar on Māori ‘achievement’. What it really was – a bunch of loser seniors saying how hard they’d worked to pass. Just pass. And then they hit us over the head with statistics about how most of us would fail; most of us would amount to sweet F.A. And it was supposed to be motivating.

Bugs is determined to do things her way. But that doesn’t mean she always manages to. She gets sucked into the vortex of bad decision making, lots of times. For the right reasons and the wrong reasons. And she’ll try to prove to you why she’s right, even when she knows she’s skating on thin ice. And don’t try to predict the outcome, because she’ll write her own script, thanks very much.

Congratulations, too, to Huia Publishing, who have made this book a pleasure to hold and read in hard copy. The spine feels strong and flexible, the pages are a good quality paper, and space is given between chapters to reflect – not that you want to pause, because the plot is compelling and drives you on. I think that the white and black of the cover, with its shot of red are superb. But I especially like the back, with the voice of Bugs already defined and strong:

‘They call me Bugs. As in Bunny.
Yeah,
I know.’

Without wanting to labour it, that all of the words except ‘I know’ are written in red (on white) with I know written in black, we already have a flavour of the character to come – who are ‘they’? The emphasis on I know – at once linking the reader (we know it’s dumb) and separating the reader (she doesnt know what I think) – ‘knowing’ is such a tenuous concept in this book.

There is so much to say about this book, but you’d be better off reading it. Be prepared to be challenged and to be richer for the experience.

I don’t think that my Year 11 son’s English teacher will use this as a text – although she should, but its language and blatant sex talk may challenge their boundaries. No actual sex, though, for those who are worried.

This is a vastly superior coming of age novel to any I have read in a long time. It is well deserving of a short listing for this year’s NZ Post Children’s Book Awards…I just wish they would properly sort their categories – because I would recommend (not censor – an important discrimination) this book for 14yrs+.

I got my copy through Fishpond

Read other reviews of this book:

Posted 10 January, 2014

Positives: Good to see Zac Harding on the panel – a real children’s book enthusiast and connected to the real target audience – children! Also good to see Ant Sang there. Graphic novels might gain some ground…

Negatives: How come there is still no Middle Grade category – picture book, junior fiction, young adult fiction and non-fiction. This really matters! This important age group, between 11ish and 14ish, are beginning to decide about themselves as readers. They have a very specific set of reading needs and parameters (usually set by the adults around them, because they are still young enough to have no power – see the great passion aroused by last year’s Young Adult winner – Into the River).

We know children often start to drop off their recreational reading at this age if they are not presented with great books that meet their needs as readers. Teachers, school librarians and parents need to feel as though they are not floundering around in a great unknown when they are trying to keep the reading flame alight!

Other countries have recognised this reading category as important, and having its own specific needs – isn’t it time we did?

Australian Children’s Book Awards

However:

‘John Beach, associate professor of literacy education at St. John’s University in New York, compared the books that adults choose for children with the books that children choose for themselves and found that in the past 30 years, there is only 5% overlap between the Children’s Choice Awards (International Reading Association) and the Notable Children’s Books list (American Library Association).’

Interesting…I would like to do some research, and see if that is the same here…

Back to the book awards: (For detailed information click here)

And the judges are…

  • Barbara Else – children’s author and former nominee
  • Ant Sang – cartoonist, graphic novelist and more…
  • Zac Harding – children’s librarian and mybestfriendsarebooks blogger

The timeline for the competition is something like this:

New Zealand Post Children’s Book Awards finalists are announced on Tuesday 8 April 2014
The New Zealand Post Children’s Book Awards national Festival of book-related events will run from 17 – 25 May 2014
New Zealand Post Children’s Book Awards ceremony will be held in Auckland on Monday 23 June 2014

 

 

 

Don’t forget there is a Children’s Choice Award in each section as well.

What books do you think should be in the short list?

What do your kids think?

I am going to do some research and think about the books I think should be there, and ask some of my fellow Book Loving Kiwis at Goodreads. I’ll be interested to compare short lists on 8 April 2014! Help me out by commenting below…

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